Get the latest
Fashion, Beauty & Shopping News

Sign
Up!

Fashion

Jewellery Trends You Need To Know For Fall/Winter 2019-2020

By  | 

You would think that in a fashion season that was decidedly feminine the jewellery trends would lean towards slim and delicate, but we are happy to report that wasn’t the case at all for Fall/Winter 2019. Designers deftly found a way to combine opulent jewellery and cheeky accessories with dark and edgy, minimalist and gender-neutral silhouettes.

On the grunge side: there were lots of cool offerings. Think punk chokers, mismatched earrings, and non-jewellery objects used as statement accessories. Most of all though, there were chains, in multi-layers, just about everywhere. There were tons of different kinds of necklaces, as well as link chains used for body jewellery and designer belts dominating fall/winter’s jewellery trends.

Of course, there was no lack of glamour, with rhinestones and pearls used in innovative ways, even on the nails. Impossibly XXL earrings, heavy ear armors, oversized chain link necklaces, and accessories dripping with colourful gemstones, cut a bold look.

We’re shining the spotlight on the definitive jewellery trends spotted on the runways of Fall/Winter 2019-2020 to ring in the festive season with an extra bit of sparkle.

Oversized Earrings

oversized jewellery

Stella McCartney

Earrings were strikingly long, oversized and an equal match for the clothes. The runways turned into a competition ground to see who could make the longest pair of earrings, and there were some great entries. From Prabal Gurung’s elbow-grazing pearly tassels to the massive neon danglers seen at Stella McCartney’s show, they were impossible to slip by unnoticed.

Ear Armor

ear armour

Prabal Gurung

The fiercest of the earrings to grace Fall 19 runways was the ear armor. This refers to earrings or cuffs that cover bulk of the ear helix, looking nothing short of an armor fit for battle. Each pair of earrings that crossed the runway at Prabal Gurung’s show was a statement in itself and took on new dimensions. Tassels of pearls and gold, layered to lend a regal look with a futuristic touch, got everyone’s attention among fall/winter’s most head-turning jewellery trends.

Mismatched Earrings

mismatched jewellery

Givenchy

Symmetry was not on the memo this fashion season. With models showcasing mismatched pairs of earrings at Givenchy, Carolina Herrera and Philip Lim, it turned out to be a study in contrasting aesthetics that packed a powerful force into any look they adorned. This one’s a must-have in our fall/winter jewellery trends wish list.

Boho

boho jewellery

Anna Demeulemeester

As designers embrace a more eco-conscious approach to fashion, it’s also reflected in the accessories used. The bohemian offerings that stood out at Fall/Winter runways were Ann Demeulemeester, Stella McCartney, Lanvin and Jacquemus, where sustainable received a lighthearted spin. From supersized faux feather tasseled neck-pieces that could have been taken straight out of a tribal trinket box, to paper clip earrings and necklaces embellished with colourful rubber bands, the only common thread running through these curiously quirky pieces was their unpredictability.

Studded Choker

choker jewellery

Gucci

Studs, metal and black leather were all over the runways as grunge and androgynous clothing took centre-stage, evoking the rebellious spirit of the late 1970s. Jewellery was key to the looks of course, with stacks of piercings and bondage style chokers making their presence felt. The collection at Alexander McQueen for instance was as punk as it gets with combat boots and chains everywhere, and models wearing dark metal chokers with subtle detailing. Gucci also led the pack with spiky leather chokers that screamed fiercely fabulous.

Logomania

chanel jewellery

Chanel

Fashion houses did not let their names go unrecognized: earrings were kissed with signatures, necklaces stamped with logos, and jewels formed tiny initials, letting designers pay homage to the heritage of their brands. Chanel dominated the name-dropping jewellery look with logo embroidered neckerchiefs and sparkling CC earrings.

Colourful Gemstones

COLOURFUL GEMSTONES

Moschino

Overstated and tailor-made for the party girl, rhinestones and colourful gemstones fell in torrents from models lobes’, swinging in time to every step. They might feel like stuff of costume jewellery, but not the way these brands rocked it. One of the most extreme runways this season was Moschino, where Jeremy Scott was all about the ‘more is more’ mentality, giving minimalism a run for its money. Models were sent down the ramp wearing oversized gold necklaces embellished with massive rocks in all colours of the rainbow.

Bejewelled Fascinators

fascinator jewellery

Dolce & Gabbana

As if big, shiny gemstones weren’t enough, dramatic hair accessories were also a hit on the runways, with Dolce & Gabbana showcasing fascinators shaped like a bejeweled bird perched atop a net veil. Then there were the sequined ones at Michael Kors that were perfectly wearable for any evening occasion. The unique head gears lent a theatrical edge to the outfits, that straddled between OTT and elegant.

Multi-layered Chains

CHAINS

Alexander McQueen

Pile on the necklaces. Layering was perfected by Alexander McQueen this season, with heavy duty industrial chains combined with leather neck bands. There’s no better way to emulate the ‘90s era grunge than by using industrial materials in jewellery. Thick metal chains were also paired with cozy sweaters at Anrealage, and thick wallet-chains with black leather detailing adorned model’s necks at Tod’s.

Oversized Chain Links

CHAIN LINK JEWELLERY

JW Anderson

Unmissable on the runways were oversized chain link jewellery, knowingly crafted with both earrings and chokers lending a punch to every look. Necklaces and earrings made with giant chain links in precious metals, with flowy designs that were glamorous rather than grunge. Chunky golden chokers at JW Anderson was a perfect embodiment of the trend.

GET HAUTERFLY IN YOUR INBOX!

Leave a Reply